Production on the new Mission: Impossible film was shut down seven times due to the coronavirus pandemic resulting in a lawsuit accusing the film’s insurance company of failing to pay out for all but one of the costly stoppages.

The stoppages were caused by positive coronavirus tests among members of the cast or crew, or quarantine or lockdowns imposed in countries where the thriller was being filmed.

The lawsuit accuses Indiana-based Federal Insurance Company of breach of contract, saying it has agreed only to pay out $5 million for the first stoppage.

Federal Insurance did not immediately return a request for comment.

Cruise, who is also a producer on the film, lost his temper on the set of Mission: Impossible 7 in England in December over a breach in Covid-19 protocols, threatening to fire cast and crew members who did not take them seriously.

Paramount said in the lawsuit that the insurance company argued there was “no evidence that those cast and crew members could not continue their duties, despite being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and posing an undeniable risk to other individuals involved with the production.”

Paramount did not say how much the shutdowns had cost but said its losses “far exceeded” the $5 million that Federal had agreed to pay for the first instance of coronavirus in February 2020.

The story was filed by the News Desk.
The Desk can be reached at info@thecorrespondent.com.pk.

The story was filed by the News Desk. The Desk can be reached at info@thecorrespondent.com.pk.

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